7 Comments
Jun 9Liked by Sebastian Jensen

This is probably more appropriate for general liberal arts. By the time you dive into some of the STEM fields the advantage of the ivy education strikes me as less certain - at least with respect to flagship state universities, which frequently have departments with higher reputations than the corresponding departments in most of the Ivy's. For example, the University of Washington's CS program is more highly rated than that of most Ivy's. I have no doubt that the cachet of Harvard or Yale will make a difference for selection of a small number of people into executive programs but you have a lot of people making enormous investments for a very low probability payoff. The vast majority of the people in STEM will do about as well with an education from a solid state university as they would have with an education from an Ivy.

I did my Physics BS from the University of Maryland, College Park more than 50 years ago. The college was open admission. So was the Physics department. We started with something like 200 students in the Physics for Physcists classes. At the end of the Sophomore year there were 5 Physics majors left. The next year we picked up a few transfers. It is my understanding that Math had a similar filter function. The fact that it was easy to get into the University said nothing about the demands and expectations of specific departments - which could and did enforce their own standards, so an analysis at the University level may not provide significant insight into the characteristics within fields within the university.

Expand full comment
Jun 9Liked by Sebastian Jensen

Did you use a pic of Yarvin because he looks dashing in those shades or because he went to Brown?

Expand full comment
author

Both.

Expand full comment

If you raised your kids right they would be disgusted by the prospect of spending four years surrounded by the type of kids who want to go to an Ivy, regardless of their IQ.

My son is happily going off to a top state school this fall having not even looked at elite schools because of the type of kids in his high school who were set on them. OTOH, he’s pursuing engineering so the state school is actually top ranked.

Would be different for an aspiring liberal arts type, I suppose.

Expand full comment

Your third sentence contradicts your first, unless you treat as axiomatic that if your kids are of the aspiring liberal arts type, you've failed as a parent.

Expand full comment

But that is axiomatic.

Expand full comment
Jun 9·edited Jun 9

Then your case is sound.

Expand full comment